A Historical Tour of the Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III, 1997. Second edition, 2013, published by Jason Metcalf for the first Utah Biennial.

New paperback Third Edition of A Historical Tour of The Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III now available at these shops:

PROVOAN Press
Center for Land Use Interpretation, Los Angeles
Benchmark Books, Salt Lake City
Ken Sanders Rare Books, Salt Lake City
Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, Salt Lake City
Salon für Kunstbuch, Vienna




UTAH BIENNIAL: MONDO UTAH
CURATED BY AARON MOULTON
UTAH MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
MAY 10 - DECEMBER 14, 2013

Ansel Adams, Wulf Barsch, Adam Bateman, Chris Burden, Mike Cassidy, Jared Clark, Maddison Colvin, Stephen Groo, Hagen Haltern, Michael Handley, Trent Harris, Nancy Holt, Levi Jackson, Annie Kennedy, Cara Krebs, David Chapman Lindsay, Paul McCarthy, Jon McNaughton, Jim Magnan, Jason Metcalf, Allen Midgette, Bob Moss, Dianne Orr, Gianni Pettena, Annie Poon, J. Kirk Richards, Jean Richardson, C. Larry Roberts, Derek Rigby, Casey Jex Smith, Jared Steffensen, Summum, Ultimus Mormon, Morganne Wakefield, Jennifer West, Andrea Bowers & Cori Redstone, Matthew Antezzo & Sesher Sah, Salt Lake Art Center Collection




FOREWORD TO THE SECOND EDITION
A HISTORICAL TOUR OF THE KINGDOM OF DESERET, VOLUME III

When I was invited to participate in the first Utah Biennial, the timing could not have been more perfect. I had recently discovered a rare out of print book, "A Historical Tour of the Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III", published in 1997 by the Historical Society of Deseret in Salt Lake City. This mysterious society was at the time unknown to me, and for some reason I had never heard of the series of tour books that explored the history of Deseret that were published by the organization, although I consider myself well read when it comes to matters pertaining to history and folklore of the Beehive State. At any rate, it was obvious to me what my contribution to the biennial would be. I proposed to complete the tour as outlined in the book, visiting each site as chronicled in the text, and to document my appearance at each with a single image. Finally, I proposed to re-publish the text in a second edition (the object you now hold in your hands), and to make it available to the audience of the exhibition so that they too, could experience a portion of the vast landscape of the Kingdom of Deseret through the lenses of history, travel, and imagination.

Although I had visited most of the ten sites at one point or another in my life, I was interested in experiencing firsthand the chronology of places as set forth in the tour, and in the possible connections that would be made between forgotten histories and the people who had lived and died in these various locations. I wanted to imagine the events while standing in each place, to allow my mind to paint a picture of what happened by visually and spatially referencing the subjects at hand, and to fill my lungs with the same air that they had once breathed. It seems that this method was what was designed for the reader and traveler by the Historical Society of Deseret, as they purposefully did not include page numbers in the book, hinting that there was no reason to jump from one point to another, but that one should start at site number one in Ephraim Canyon, and continue until reaching the tallest point in the Kingdom, the summit of King's Peak in the Uintah Mountains. It was at this final site, while peering across the immensity of space within the Kingdom, that I realized that the journey that I had completed was now my own unique story.

While I was going from place to place, eating and sleeping along the way, some very unusual things occurred, all of which I can't fully disclose because that would merit too much space within these pages, and also because some of these events are too personal in nature to me. However, there is one experience that I would like to share with you. As I was driving between Boyd Station and River Heights Cemetery on the old Pony Express-Overland Stage Trail, my car blew a tire, causing it to veer off the side of the road. My vehicle was now high centered on the edge of the ditch, and there was no logical way to get it out. Even though I was able to replace my tire as my car precariously balanced on its frame, there was nothing for my wheels to grip and thus drive me out of this unfortunate situation. Not sure what to do, and without cellphone reception to call for assistance, I looked around for some material to build up under my tires, but nothing was in sight. I didn't have a shovel, and even if I possessed one, it would have taken many hours to displace enough earth below my car, and I'm not sure it would have been compact enough for sufficient resistance. I then heard the thunder of the fast approaching clouds beyond the not so distant mountains, and became worried that the impending rains would cause the ground to soften and my car to subsequently be swallowed in the mud. At that moment an old man with bright white hair and a snowy beard suddenly appeared, seemingly out of nowhere. He asked if I needed assistance and I explained the situation and that I needed to get my car out of the ditch. He told me that luckily, about 25 yards down the road, under some overgrown sagebrush, was the ruins of an old stone structure. He led me to the place, and helped me carry the heavy stones and stack them one by one beneath my car until they paved a cobbled path for me to drive on. We worked quickly, and just as we placed the last stone it began to rain. I quickly jumped in my car so I could make sure I could get back onto the road. After shutting the door and placing my keys in the ignition, I glanced up and the old man was gone. I have no idea who the man was or where he came from, but without his assistance, my situation that day could have been very dire.

I recently had the pleasure of visiting with the performance artist, Simone Forti, in her home in Los Angeles. She told me that either Allen Ginsberg or Jack Kerouac (she couldn't recall who exactly) once instructed her to "notice what you notice". It is my hope that as you travel and walk the paved and dusty roads of the Kingdom as you complete this tour, that you will notice what you notice, and write these impressions and observations in the back of this book. It is then that you will write and record your own history within the Kingdom of Deseret.


Jason Metcalf, 2013



A Historical Tour of the Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III, 1997. Second edition, 2013, published by Jason Metcalf for the first Utah Biennial.

New paperback Third Edition of A Historical Tour of The Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III now available at these shops:

PROVOAN Press
Center for Land Use Interpretation, Los Angeles
Benchmark Books, Salt Lake City
Ken Sanders Rare Books, Salt Lake City
Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, Salt Lake City
Salon für Kunstbuch, Vienna




UTAH BIENNIAL: MONDO UTAH
CURATED BY AARON MOULTON
UTAH MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
MAY 10 - DECEMBER 14, 2013

Ansel Adams, Wulf Barsch, Adam Bateman, Chris Burden, Mike Cassidy, Jared Clark, Maddison Colvin, Stephen Groo, Hagen Haltern, Michael Handley, Trent Harris, Nancy Holt, Levi Jackson, Annie Kennedy, Cara Krebs, David Chapman Lindsay, Paul McCarthy, Jon McNaughton, Jim Magnan, Jason Metcalf, Allen Midgette, Bob Moss, Dianne Orr, Gianni Pettena, Annie Poon, J. Kirk Richards, Jean Richardson, C. Larry Roberts, Derek Rigby, Casey Jex Smith, Jared Steffensen, Summum, Ultimus Mormon, Morganne Wakefield, Jennifer West, Andrea Bowers & Cori Redstone, Matthew Antezzo & Sesher Sah, Salt Lake Art Center Collection




FOREWORD TO THE SECOND EDITION
A HISTORICAL TOUR OF THE KINGDOM OF DESERET, VOLUME III

When I was invited to participate in the first Utah Biennial, the timing could not have been more perfect. I had recently discovered a rare out of print book, "A Historical Tour of the Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III", published in 1997 by the Historical Society of Deseret in Salt Lake City. This mysterious society was at the time unknown to me, and for some reason I had never heard of the series of tour books that explored the history of Deseret that were published by the organization, although I consider myself well read when it comes to matters pertaining to history and folklore of the Beehive State. At any rate, it was obvious to me what my contribution to the biennial would be. I proposed to complete the tour as outlined in the book, visiting each site as chronicled in the text, and to document my appearance at each with a single image. Finally, I proposed to re-publish the text in a second edition (the object you now hold in your hands), and to make it available to the audience of the exhibition so that they too, could experience a portion of the vast landscape of the Kingdom of Deseret through the lenses of history, travel, and imagination.

Although I had visited most of the ten sites at one point or another in my life, I was interested in experiencing firsthand the chronology of places as set forth in the tour, and in the possible connections that would be made between forgotten histories and the people who had lived and died in these various locations. I wanted to imagine the events while standing in each place, to allow my mind to paint a picture of what happened by visually and spatially referencing the subjects at hand, and to fill my lungs with the same air that they had once breathed. It seems that this method was what was designed for the reader and traveler by the Historical Society of Deseret, as they purposefully did not include page numbers in the book, hinting that there was no reason to jump from one point to another, but that one should start at site number one in Ephraim Canyon, and continue until reaching the tallest point in the Kingdom, the summit of King's Peak in the Uintah Mountains. It was at this final site, while peering across the immensity of space within the Kingdom, that I realized that the journey that I had completed was now my own unique story.

While I was going from place to place, eating and sleeping along the way, some very unusual things occurred, all of which I can't fully disclose because that would merit too much space within these pages, and also because some of these events are too personal in nature to me. However, there is one experience that I would like to share with you. As I was driving between Boyd Station and River Heights Cemetery on the old Pony Express-Overland Stage Trail, my car blew a tire, causing it to veer off the side of the road. My vehicle was now high centered on the edge of the ditch, and there was no logical way to get it out. Even though I was able to replace my tire as my car precariously balanced on its frame, there was nothing for my wheels to grip and thus drive me out of this unfortunate situation. Not sure what to do, and without cellphone reception to call for assistance, I looked around for some material to build up under my tires, but nothing was in sight. I didn't have a shovel, and even if I possessed one, it would have taken many hours to displace enough earth below my car, and I'm not sure it would have been compact enough for sufficient resistance. I then heard the thunder of the fast approaching clouds beyond the not so distant mountains, and became worried that the impending rains would cause the ground to soften and my car to subsequently be swallowed in the mud. At that moment an old man with bright white hair and a snowy beard suddenly appeared, seemingly out of nowhere. He asked if I needed assistance and I explained the situation and that I needed to get my car out of the ditch. He told me that luckily, about 25 yards down the road, under some overgrown sagebrush, was the ruins of an old stone structure. He led me to the place, and helped me carry the heavy stones and stack them one by one beneath my car until they paved a cobbled path for me to drive on. We worked quickly, and just as we placed the last stone it began to rain. I quickly jumped in my car so I could make sure I could get back onto the road. After shutting the door and placing my keys in the ignition, I glanced up and the old man was gone. I have no idea who the man was or where he came from, but without his assistance, my situation that day could have been very dire.

I recently had the pleasure of visiting with the performance artist, Simone Forti, in her home in Los Angeles. She told me that either Allen Ginsberg or Jack Kerouac (she couldn't recall who exactly) once instructed her to "notice what you notice". It is my hope that as you travel and walk the paved and dusty roads of the Kingdom as you complete this tour, that you will notice what you notice, and write these impressions and observations in the back of this book. It is then that you will write and record your own history within the Kingdom of Deseret.


Jason Metcalf, 2013



A Historical Tour of the Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III, 1997, published by the Historical Society of Deseret. Courtesy the private collection of Jason Metcalf.

New paperback Third Edition of A Historical Tour of The Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III now available at these shops:

PROVOAN Press
Center for Land Use Interpretation, Los Angeles
Benchmark Books, Salt Lake City
Ken Sanders Rare Books, Salt Lake City
Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, Salt Lake City
Salon für Kunstbuch, Vienna




UTAH BIENNIAL: MONDO UTAH
CURATED BY AARON MOULTON
UTAH MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
MAY 10 - DECEMBER 14, 2013

Ansel Adams, Wulf Barsch, Adam Bateman, Chris Burden, Mike Cassidy, Jared Clark, Maddison Colvin, Stephen Groo, Hagen Haltern, Michael Handley, Trent Harris, Nancy Holt, Levi Jackson, Annie Kennedy, Cara Krebs, David Chapman Lindsay, Paul McCarthy, Jon McNaughton, Jim Magnan, Jason Metcalf, Allen Midgette, Bob Moss, Dianne Orr, Gianni Pettena, Annie Poon, J. Kirk Richards, Jean Richardson, C. Larry Roberts, Derek Rigby, Casey Jex Smith, Jared Steffensen, Summum, Ultimus Mormon, Morganne Wakefield, Jennifer West, Andrea Bowers & Cori Redstone, Matthew Antezzo & Sesher Sah, Salt Lake Art Center Collection




FOREWORD TO THE SECOND EDITION
A HISTORICAL TOUR OF THE KINGDOM OF DESERET, VOLUME III

When I was invited to participate in the first Utah Biennial, the timing could not have been more perfect. I had recently discovered a rare out of print book, "A Historical Tour of the Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III", published in 1997 by the Historical Society of Deseret in Salt Lake City. This mysterious society was at the time unknown to me, and for some reason I had never heard of the series of tour books that explored the history of Deseret that were published by the organization, although I consider myself well read when it comes to matters pertaining to history and folklore of the Beehive State. At any rate, it was obvious to me what my contribution to the biennial would be. I proposed to complete the tour as outlined in the book, visiting each site as chronicled in the text, and to document my appearance at each with a single image. Finally, I proposed to re-publish the text in a second edition (the object you now hold in your hands), and to make it available to the audience of the exhibition so that they too, could experience a portion of the vast landscape of the Kingdom of Deseret through the lenses of history, travel, and imagination.

Although I had visited most of the ten sites at one point or another in my life, I was interested in experiencing firsthand the chronology of places as set forth in the tour, and in the possible connections that would be made between forgotten histories and the people who had lived and died in these various locations. I wanted to imagine the events while standing in each place, to allow my mind to paint a picture of what happened by visually and spatially referencing the subjects at hand, and to fill my lungs with the same air that they had once breathed. It seems that this method was what was designed for the reader and traveler by the Historical Society of Deseret, as they purposefully did not include page numbers in the book, hinting that there was no reason to jump from one point to another, but that one should start at site number one in Ephraim Canyon, and continue until reaching the tallest point in the Kingdom, the summit of King's Peak in the Uintah Mountains. It was at this final site, while peering across the immensity of space within the Kingdom, that I realized that the journey that I had completed was now my own unique story.

While I was going from place to place, eating and sleeping along the way, some very unusual things occurred, all of which I can't fully disclose because that would merit too much space within these pages, and also because some of these events are too personal in nature to me. However, there is one experience that I would like to share with you. As I was driving between Boyd Station and River Heights Cemetery on the old Pony Express-Overland Stage Trail, my car blew a tire, causing it to veer off the side of the road. My vehicle was now high centered on the edge of the ditch, and there was no logical way to get it out. Even though I was able to replace my tire as my car precariously balanced on its frame, there was nothing for my wheels to grip and thus drive me out of this unfortunate situation. Not sure what to do, and without cellphone reception to call for assistance, I looked around for some material to build up under my tires, but nothing was in sight. I didn't have a shovel, and even if I possessed one, it would have taken many hours to displace enough earth below my car, and I'm not sure it would have been compact enough for sufficient resistance. I then heard the thunder of the fast approaching clouds beyond the not so distant mountains, and became worried that the impending rains would cause the ground to soften and my car to subsequently be swallowed in the mud. At that moment an old man with bright white hair and a snowy beard suddenly appeared, seemingly out of nowhere. He asked if I needed assistance and I explained the situation and that I needed to get my car out of the ditch. He told me that luckily, about 25 yards down the road, under some overgrown sagebrush, was the ruins of an old stone structure. He led me to the place, and helped me carry the heavy stones and stack them one by one beneath my car until they paved a cobbled path for me to drive on. We worked quickly, and just as we placed the last stone it began to rain. I quickly jumped in my car so I could make sure I could get back onto the road. After shutting the door and placing my keys in the ignition, I glanced up and the old man was gone. I have no idea who the man was or where he came from, but without his assistance, my situation that day could have been very dire.

I recently had the pleasure of visiting with the performance artist, Simone Forti, in her home in Los Angeles. She told me that either Allen Ginsberg or Jack Kerouac (she couldn't recall who exactly) once instructed her to "notice what you notice". It is my hope that as you travel and walk the paved and dusty roads of the Kingdom as you complete this tour, that you will notice what you notice, and write these impressions and observations in the back of this book. It is then that you will write and record your own history within the Kingdom of Deseret.


Jason Metcalf, 2013



 

New paperback Third Edition of A Historical Tour of The Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III now available at these shops:

PROVOAN Press
Center for Land Use Interpretation, Los Angeles
Benchmark Books, Salt Lake City
Ken Sanders Rare Books, Salt Lake City
Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, Salt Lake City
Salon für Kunstbuch, Vienna




UTAH BIENNIAL: MONDO UTAH
CURATED BY AARON MOULTON
UTAH MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
MAY 10 - DECEMBER 14, 2013

Ansel Adams, Wulf Barsch, Adam Bateman, Chris Burden, Mike Cassidy, Jared Clark, Maddison Colvin, Stephen Groo, Hagen Haltern, Michael Handley, Trent Harris, Nancy Holt, Levi Jackson, Annie Kennedy, Cara Krebs, David Chapman Lindsay, Paul McCarthy, Jon McNaughton, Jim Magnan, Jason Metcalf, Allen Midgette, Bob Moss, Dianne Orr, Gianni Pettena, Annie Poon, J. Kirk Richards, Jean Richardson, C. Larry Roberts, Derek Rigby, Casey Jex Smith, Jared Steffensen, Summum, Ultimus Mormon, Morganne Wakefield, Jennifer West, Andrea Bowers & Cori Redstone, Matthew Antezzo & Sesher Sah, Salt Lake Art Center Collection




FOREWORD TO THE SECOND EDITION
A HISTORICAL TOUR OF THE KINGDOM OF DESERET, VOLUME III

When I was invited to participate in the first Utah Biennial, the timing could not have been more perfect. I had recently discovered a rare out of print book, "A Historical Tour of the Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III", published in 1997 by the Historical Society of Deseret in Salt Lake City. This mysterious society was at the time unknown to me, and for some reason I had never heard of the series of tour books that explored the history of Deseret that were published by the organization, although I consider myself well read when it comes to matters pertaining to history and folklore of the Beehive State. At any rate, it was obvious to me what my contribution to the biennial would be. I proposed to complete the tour as outlined in the book, visiting each site as chronicled in the text, and to document my appearance at each with a single image. Finally, I proposed to re-publish the text in a second edition (the object you now hold in your hands), and to make it available to the audience of the exhibition so that they too, could experience a portion of the vast landscape of the Kingdom of Deseret through the lenses of history, travel, and imagination.

Although I had visited most of the ten sites at one point or another in my life, I was interested in experiencing firsthand the chronology of places as set forth in the tour, and in the possible connections that would be made between forgotten histories and the people who had lived and died in these various locations. I wanted to imagine the events while standing in each place, to allow my mind to paint a picture of what happened by visually and spatially referencing the subjects at hand, and to fill my lungs with the same air that they had once breathed. It seems that this method was what was designed for the reader and traveler by the Historical Society of Deseret, as they purposefully did not include page numbers in the book, hinting that there was no reason to jump from one point to another, but that one should start at site number one in Ephraim Canyon, and continue until reaching the tallest point in the Kingdom, the summit of King's Peak in the Uintah Mountains. It was at this final site, while peering across the immensity of space within the Kingdom, that I realized that the journey that I had completed was now my own unique story.

While I was going from place to place, eating and sleeping along the way, some very unusual things occurred, all of which I can't fully disclose because that would merit too much space within these pages, and also because some of these events are too personal in nature to me. However, there is one experience that I would like to share with you. As I was driving between Boyd Station and River Heights Cemetery on the old Pony Express-Overland Stage Trail, my car blew a tire, causing it to veer off the side of the road. My vehicle was now high centered on the edge of the ditch, and there was no logical way to get it out. Even though I was able to replace my tire as my car precariously balanced on its frame, there was nothing for my wheels to grip and thus drive me out of this unfortunate situation. Not sure what to do, and without cellphone reception to call for assistance, I looked around for some material to build up under my tires, but nothing was in sight. I didn't have a shovel, and even if I possessed one, it would have taken many hours to displace enough earth below my car, and I'm not sure it would have been compact enough for sufficient resistance. I then heard the thunder of the fast approaching clouds beyond the not so distant mountains, and became worried that the impending rains would cause the ground to soften and my car to subsequently be swallowed in the mud. At that moment an old man with bright white hair and a snowy beard suddenly appeared, seemingly out of nowhere. He asked if I needed assistance and I explained the situation and that I needed to get my car out of the ditch. He told me that luckily, about 25 yards down the road, under some overgrown sagebrush, was the ruins of an old stone structure. He led me to the place, and helped me carry the heavy stones and stack them one by one beneath my car until they paved a cobbled path for me to drive on. We worked quickly, and just as we placed the last stone it began to rain. I quickly jumped in my car so I could make sure I could get back onto the road. After shutting the door and placing my keys in the ignition, I glanced up and the old man was gone. I have no idea who the man was or where he came from, but without his assistance, my situation that day could have been very dire.

I recently had the pleasure of visiting with the performance artist, Simone Forti, in her home in Los Angeles. She told me that either Allen Ginsberg or Jack Kerouac (she couldn't recall who exactly) once instructed her to "notice what you notice". It is my hope that as you travel and walk the paved and dusty roads of the Kingdom as you complete this tour, that you will notice what you notice, and write these impressions and observations in the back of this book. It is then that you will write and record your own history within the Kingdom of Deseret.


Jason Metcalf, 2013



A Historical Tour of the Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III, second edition, 2013. Published by Jason Metcalf for the first Utah Biennial.

New paperback Third Edition of A Historical Tour of The Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III now available at these shops:

PROVOAN Press
Center for Land Use Interpretation, Los Angeles
Benchmark Books, Salt Lake City
Ken Sanders Rare Books, Salt Lake City
Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, Salt Lake City
Salon für Kunstbuch, Vienna




UTAH BIENNIAL: MONDO UTAH
CURATED BY AARON MOULTON
UTAH MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
MAY 10 - DECEMBER 14, 2013

Ansel Adams, Wulf Barsch, Adam Bateman, Chris Burden, Mike Cassidy, Jared Clark, Maddison Colvin, Stephen Groo, Hagen Haltern, Michael Handley, Trent Harris, Nancy Holt, Levi Jackson, Annie Kennedy, Cara Krebs, David Chapman Lindsay, Paul McCarthy, Jon McNaughton, Jim Magnan, Jason Metcalf, Allen Midgette, Bob Moss, Dianne Orr, Gianni Pettena, Annie Poon, J. Kirk Richards, Jean Richardson, C. Larry Roberts, Derek Rigby, Casey Jex Smith, Jared Steffensen, Summum, Ultimus Mormon, Morganne Wakefield, Jennifer West, Andrea Bowers & Cori Redstone, Matthew Antezzo & Sesher Sah, Salt Lake Art Center Collection




FOREWORD TO THE SECOND EDITION
A HISTORICAL TOUR OF THE KINGDOM OF DESERET, VOLUME III

When I was invited to participate in the first Utah Biennial, the timing could not have been more perfect. I had recently discovered a rare out of print book, "A Historical Tour of the Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III", published in 1997 by the Historical Society of Deseret in Salt Lake City. This mysterious society was at the time unknown to me, and for some reason I had never heard of the series of tour books that explored the history of Deseret that were published by the organization, although I consider myself well read when it comes to matters pertaining to history and folklore of the Beehive State. At any rate, it was obvious to me what my contribution to the biennial would be. I proposed to complete the tour as outlined in the book, visiting each site as chronicled in the text, and to document my appearance at each with a single image. Finally, I proposed to re-publish the text in a second edition (the object you now hold in your hands), and to make it available to the audience of the exhibition so that they too, could experience a portion of the vast landscape of the Kingdom of Deseret through the lenses of history, travel, and imagination.

Although I had visited most of the ten sites at one point or another in my life, I was interested in experiencing firsthand the chronology of places as set forth in the tour, and in the possible connections that would be made between forgotten histories and the people who had lived and died in these various locations. I wanted to imagine the events while standing in each place, to allow my mind to paint a picture of what happened by visually and spatially referencing the subjects at hand, and to fill my lungs with the same air that they had once breathed. It seems that this method was what was designed for the reader and traveler by the Historical Society of Deseret, as they purposefully did not include page numbers in the book, hinting that there was no reason to jump from one point to another, but that one should start at site number one in Ephraim Canyon, and continue until reaching the tallest point in the Kingdom, the summit of King's Peak in the Uintah Mountains. It was at this final site, while peering across the immensity of space within the Kingdom, that I realized that the journey that I had completed was now my own unique story.

While I was going from place to place, eating and sleeping along the way, some very unusual things occurred, all of which I can't fully disclose because that would merit too much space within these pages, and also because some of these events are too personal in nature to me. However, there is one experience that I would like to share with you. As I was driving between Boyd Station and River Heights Cemetery on the old Pony Express-Overland Stage Trail, my car blew a tire, causing it to veer off the side of the road. My vehicle was now high centered on the edge of the ditch, and there was no logical way to get it out. Even though I was able to replace my tire as my car precariously balanced on its frame, there was nothing for my wheels to grip and thus drive me out of this unfortunate situation. Not sure what to do, and without cellphone reception to call for assistance, I looked around for some material to build up under my tires, but nothing was in sight. I didn't have a shovel, and even if I possessed one, it would have taken many hours to displace enough earth below my car, and I'm not sure it would have been compact enough for sufficient resistance. I then heard the thunder of the fast approaching clouds beyond the not so distant mountains, and became worried that the impending rains would cause the ground to soften and my car to subsequently be swallowed in the mud. At that moment an old man with bright white hair and a snowy beard suddenly appeared, seemingly out of nowhere. He asked if I needed assistance and I explained the situation and that I needed to get my car out of the ditch. He told me that luckily, about 25 yards down the road, under some overgrown sagebrush, was the ruins of an old stone structure. He led me to the place, and helped me carry the heavy stones and stack them one by one beneath my car until they paved a cobbled path for me to drive on. We worked quickly, and just as we placed the last stone it began to rain. I quickly jumped in my car so I could make sure I could get back onto the road. After shutting the door and placing my keys in the ignition, I glanced up and the old man was gone. I have no idea who the man was or where he came from, but without his assistance, my situation that day could have been very dire.

I recently had the pleasure of visiting with the performance artist, Simone Forti, in her home in Los Angeles. She told me that either Allen Ginsberg or Jack Kerouac (she couldn't recall who exactly) once instructed her to "notice what you notice". It is my hope that as you travel and walk the paved and dusty roads of the Kingdom as you complete this tour, that you will notice what you notice, and write these impressions and observations in the back of this book. It is then that you will write and record your own history within the Kingdom of Deseret.


Jason Metcalf, 2013



Detail from the design of the original Flag of the Kingdom of Deseret, 1849. Design based on original drawings by Jonothan Goldman of Salt Lake City, Utah.

New paperback Third Edition of A Historical Tour of The Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III now available at these shops:

PROVOAN Press
Center for Land Use Interpretation, Los Angeles
Benchmark Books, Salt Lake City
Ken Sanders Rare Books, Salt Lake City
Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, Salt Lake City
Salon für Kunstbuch, Vienna




UTAH BIENNIAL: MONDO UTAH
CURATED BY AARON MOULTON
UTAH MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
MAY 10 - DECEMBER 14, 2013

Ansel Adams, Wulf Barsch, Adam Bateman, Chris Burden, Mike Cassidy, Jared Clark, Maddison Colvin, Stephen Groo, Hagen Haltern, Michael Handley, Trent Harris, Nancy Holt, Levi Jackson, Annie Kennedy, Cara Krebs, David Chapman Lindsay, Paul McCarthy, Jon McNaughton, Jim Magnan, Jason Metcalf, Allen Midgette, Bob Moss, Dianne Orr, Gianni Pettena, Annie Poon, J. Kirk Richards, Jean Richardson, C. Larry Roberts, Derek Rigby, Casey Jex Smith, Jared Steffensen, Summum, Ultimus Mormon, Morganne Wakefield, Jennifer West, Andrea Bowers & Cori Redstone, Matthew Antezzo & Sesher Sah, Salt Lake Art Center Collection




FOREWORD TO THE SECOND EDITION
A HISTORICAL TOUR OF THE KINGDOM OF DESERET, VOLUME III

When I was invited to participate in the first Utah Biennial, the timing could not have been more perfect. I had recently discovered a rare out of print book, "A Historical Tour of the Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III", published in 1997 by the Historical Society of Deseret in Salt Lake City. This mysterious society was at the time unknown to me, and for some reason I had never heard of the series of tour books that explored the history of Deseret that were published by the organization, although I consider myself well read when it comes to matters pertaining to history and folklore of the Beehive State. At any rate, it was obvious to me what my contribution to the biennial would be. I proposed to complete the tour as outlined in the book, visiting each site as chronicled in the text, and to document my appearance at each with a single image. Finally, I proposed to re-publish the text in a second edition (the object you now hold in your hands), and to make it available to the audience of the exhibition so that they too, could experience a portion of the vast landscape of the Kingdom of Deseret through the lenses of history, travel, and imagination.

Although I had visited most of the ten sites at one point or another in my life, I was interested in experiencing firsthand the chronology of places as set forth in the tour, and in the possible connections that would be made between forgotten histories and the people who had lived and died in these various locations. I wanted to imagine the events while standing in each place, to allow my mind to paint a picture of what happened by visually and spatially referencing the subjects at hand, and to fill my lungs with the same air that they had once breathed. It seems that this method was what was designed for the reader and traveler by the Historical Society of Deseret, as they purposefully did not include page numbers in the book, hinting that there was no reason to jump from one point to another, but that one should start at site number one in Ephraim Canyon, and continue until reaching the tallest point in the Kingdom, the summit of King's Peak in the Uintah Mountains. It was at this final site, while peering across the immensity of space within the Kingdom, that I realized that the journey that I had completed was now my own unique story.

While I was going from place to place, eating and sleeping along the way, some very unusual things occurred, all of which I can't fully disclose because that would merit too much space within these pages, and also because some of these events are too personal in nature to me. However, there is one experience that I would like to share with you. As I was driving between Boyd Station and River Heights Cemetery on the old Pony Express-Overland Stage Trail, my car blew a tire, causing it to veer off the side of the road. My vehicle was now high centered on the edge of the ditch, and there was no logical way to get it out. Even though I was able to replace my tire as my car precariously balanced on its frame, there was nothing for my wheels to grip and thus drive me out of this unfortunate situation. Not sure what to do, and without cellphone reception to call for assistance, I looked around for some material to build up under my tires, but nothing was in sight. I didn't have a shovel, and even if I possessed one, it would have taken many hours to displace enough earth below my car, and I'm not sure it would have been compact enough for sufficient resistance. I then heard the thunder of the fast approaching clouds beyond the not so distant mountains, and became worried that the impending rains would cause the ground to soften and my car to subsequently be swallowed in the mud. At that moment an old man with bright white hair and a snowy beard suddenly appeared, seemingly out of nowhere. He asked if I needed assistance and I explained the situation and that I needed to get my car out of the ditch. He told me that luckily, about 25 yards down the road, under some overgrown sagebrush, was the ruins of an old stone structure. He led me to the place, and helped me carry the heavy stones and stack them one by one beneath my car until they paved a cobbled path for me to drive on. We worked quickly, and just as we placed the last stone it began to rain. I quickly jumped in my car so I could make sure I could get back onto the road. After shutting the door and placing my keys in the ignition, I glanced up and the old man was gone. I have no idea who the man was or where he came from, but without his assistance, my situation that day could have been very dire.

I recently had the pleasure of visiting with the performance artist, Simone Forti, in her home in Los Angeles. She told me that either Allen Ginsberg or Jack Kerouac (she couldn't recall who exactly) once instructed her to "notice what you notice". It is my hope that as you travel and walk the paved and dusty roads of the Kingdom as you complete this tour, that you will notice what you notice, and write these impressions and observations in the back of this book. It is then that you will write and record your own history within the Kingdom of Deseret.


Jason Metcalf, 2013



A Historical Tour of the Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III, second edition, 2013. Published by Jason Metcalf for the first Utah Biennial.

New paperback Third Edition of A Historical Tour of The Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III now available at these shops:

PROVOAN Press
Center for Land Use Interpretation, Los Angeles
Benchmark Books, Salt Lake City
Ken Sanders Rare Books, Salt Lake City
Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, Salt Lake City
Salon für Kunstbuch, Vienna




UTAH BIENNIAL: MONDO UTAH
CURATED BY AARON MOULTON
UTAH MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
MAY 10 - DECEMBER 14, 2013

Ansel Adams, Wulf Barsch, Adam Bateman, Chris Burden, Mike Cassidy, Jared Clark, Maddison Colvin, Stephen Groo, Hagen Haltern, Michael Handley, Trent Harris, Nancy Holt, Levi Jackson, Annie Kennedy, Cara Krebs, David Chapman Lindsay, Paul McCarthy, Jon McNaughton, Jim Magnan, Jason Metcalf, Allen Midgette, Bob Moss, Dianne Orr, Gianni Pettena, Annie Poon, J. Kirk Richards, Jean Richardson, C. Larry Roberts, Derek Rigby, Casey Jex Smith, Jared Steffensen, Summum, Ultimus Mormon, Morganne Wakefield, Jennifer West, Andrea Bowers & Cori Redstone, Matthew Antezzo & Sesher Sah, Salt Lake Art Center Collection




FOREWORD TO THE SECOND EDITION
A HISTORICAL TOUR OF THE KINGDOM OF DESERET, VOLUME III

When I was invited to participate in the first Utah Biennial, the timing could not have been more perfect. I had recently discovered a rare out of print book, "A Historical Tour of the Kingdom of Deseret, Volume III", published in 1997 by the Historical Society of Deseret in Salt Lake City. This mysterious society was at the time unknown to me, and for some reason I had never heard of the series of tour books that explored the history of Deseret that were published by the organization, although I consider myself well read when it comes to matters pertaining to history and folklore of the Beehive State. At any rate, it was obvious to me what my contribution to the biennial would be. I proposed to complete the tour as outlined in the book, visiting each site as chronicled in the text, and to document my appearance at each with a single image. Finally, I proposed to re-publish the text in a second edition (the object you now hold in your hands), and to make it available to the audience of the exhibition so that they too, could experience a portion of the vast landscape of the Kingdom of Deseret through the lenses of history, travel, and imagination.

Although I had visited most of the ten sites at one point or another in my life, I was interested in experiencing firsthand the chronology of places as set forth in the tour, and in the possible connections that would be made between forgotten histories and the people who had lived and died in these various locations. I wanted to imagine the events while standing in each place, to allow my mind to paint a picture of what happened by visually and spatially referencing the subjects at hand, and to fill my lungs with the same air that they had once breathed. It seems that this method was what was designed for the reader and traveler by the Historical Society of Deseret, as they purposefully did not include page numbers in the book, hinting that there was no reason to jump from one point to another, but that one should start at site number one in Ephraim Canyon, and continue until reaching the tallest point in the Kingdom, the summit of King's Peak in the Uintah Mountains. It was at this final site, while peering across the immensity of space within the Kingdom, that I realized that the journey that I had completed was now my own unique story.

While I was going from place to place, eating and sleeping along the way, some very unusual things occurred, all of which I can't fully disclose because that would merit too much space within these pages, and also because some of these events are too personal in nature to me. However, there is one experience that I would like to share with you. As I was driving between Boyd Station and River Heights Cemetery on the old Pony Express-Overland Stage Trail, my car blew a tire, causing it to veer off the side of the road. My vehicle was now high centered on the edge of the ditch, and there was no logical way to get it out. Even though I was able to replace my tire as my car precariously balanced on its frame, there was nothing for my wheels to grip and thus drive me out of this unfortunate situation. Not sure what to do, and without cellphone reception to call for assistance, I looked around for some material to build up under my tires, but nothing was in sight. I didn't have a shovel, and even if I possessed one, it would have taken many hours to displace enough earth below my car, and I'm not sure it would have been compact enough for sufficient resistance. I then heard the thunder of the fast approaching clouds beyond the not so distant mountains, and became worried that the impending rains would cause the ground to soften and my car to subsequently be swallowed in the mud. At that moment an old man with bright white hair and a snowy beard suddenly appeared, seemingly out of nowhere. He asked if I needed assistance and I explained the situation and that I needed to get my car out of the ditch. He told me that luckily, about 25 yards down the road, under some overgrown sagebrush, was the ruins of an old stone structure. He led me to the place, and helped me carry the heavy stones and stack them one by one beneath my car until they paved a cobbled path for me to drive on. We worked quickly, and just as we placed the last stone it began to rain. I quickly jumped in my car so I could make sure I could get back onto the road. After shutting the door and placing my keys in the ignition, I glanced up and the old man was gone. I have no idea who the man was or where he came from, but without his assistance, my situation that day could have been very dire.

I recently had the pleasure of visiting with the performance artist, Simone Forti, in her home in Los Angeles. She told me that either Allen Ginsberg or Jack Kerouac (she couldn't recall who exactly) once instructed her to "notice what you notice". It is my hope that as you travel and walk the paved and dusty roads of the Kingdom as you complete this tour, that you will notice what you notice, and write these impressions and observations in the back of this book. It is then that you will write and record your own history within the Kingdom of Deseret.


Jason Metcalf, 2013